It’s finally here, moving day! Whether you’re heading into a new home or apartment, the excitement, and stress that comes along with the process is one that cannot be avoided.

Did you know that moving is consistently rated as one of life’s most stressful events? It ranks right up there with death of a loved one, divorce, job loss, etc. Even if your move is a happy one, it doesn’t lessen the stress that comes along with it. It is still a massive disruption of your routine, combined with all that is familiar to you. And no matter how well you plan, that feeling will not change.

Now, you’ve spent weeks (maybe even months) planning and packing, so when the actual day arrives, you’re bound to be in overdrive. Along with all of things you’re going to have to take into consideration, if you’re a pet owner, add another item to your pre-moving check list.

If you think the process is tough, imagine just how stressful it can be for your pet. Dogs especially can easily become stressed out when there is unexpected activity in the home, or even when introduced to a new environment.

Animals are creatures of habit, and for them, change, no matter how big or small we think it may be, can be both confusing and stressful.

So while you’re planning out the specifics for moving day, it’s important to also plan ahead for your pet. In order to ensure he or she is relaxed, and safe, on the big day, we’ve compiled a few top tips to help make the move a success for all members of your family.

Contact your vet

If you’re moving out of state, or out of the local area, contact your vet to obtain your pet’s medical records along with any current prescriptions. Part of relocating involves finding new doctors and that includes a new veterinarian. Ask your current vet if they can recommend a new doctor before beginning to do so on your own.

Plan Ahead

Prior to moving, it’s a good idea to visit your vet. According to Dr. Rachel Barrack, Founder of concierge veterinary practice Animal Acupuncture, you should make sure your pet is up to date on all vaccinations. If you’re traveling by air, Dr. Barrack stresses the importance of checking with the airline beforehand to confirm all necessary paperwork prior to the day of departure. If traveling by car, make sure your pet is used to their crate and plan ahead for bathroom and water breaks.

Pack An Accessible Bag for Your Pet

Included in your pet’s to-go bag should be a leash, bowls for food and water, food, medications, wee-wee pads or litter box, bed, and favorite toys so when you get into your new home you won’t be rummaging through boxes, Dr. Barrack points out.

Keep pets away from the action

One of the best ways to help your pet remain calm is to keep them in a quiet area although that might not be possible on moving day. You don’t want them getting underfoot or accidentally getting out. A good idea to consider is either boarding for a night or two or doggy daycare. If that’s an option you’d like to explore, Brooklyn is home to a variety of options. A few local places include:

Keep in mind, before your pet is able to board or spend the day in daycare, most animal facilities require the animals go through an evaluation to ensure they’re a fit, and to protect the safety of all the animals already at the facility. All vaccinations will need to be up to date as well so make sure to find out from your veterinarian which ones your pet will need. And lastly, some months may be more popular than others at the facility, so once you have your moving dates, call to reserve your pet’s spot.

Move the house before you move your pet

Set up as much of your new home as best you can before introducing your pet to his or her new digs. Let them slowly adjust to their new surroundings. Re-introduce familiar objects and make sure to give your pup lots of attention in the process. You can even walk them from room to room to take in the new scents they’re sure to pick up on.

Update information

Once you’re settled, make sure to update your new contact information. That includes notifying your vet, ordering new ID tags, and if your dog is microchipped, calling the company and ensuring they have all of the new and most current information.

Stick to a Schedule

Dr. Barrack stresses the importance of sticking to a schedule once the move is complete. Even though you’re in a new place, sticking to their usual eating, exercise, and sleeping schedule as best as possible will help to minimize the stress.

Most pets love predictability and routine, so a move can throw them into a tailspin. Change can be confusing and stressful so be mindful of their needs as you prepare your move.

And most importantly, Dr. Barrack stresses the importance of being patient. Once you arrive at your new home, it will often take even the most well-behaved pets a few days to adjust to their new surroundings.  Consult with your vet as well on the best ways in which to ensure a smooth transition.

After almost three months of sheltering in place, many people have had quite a few realizations about their lives and what’s most important to them. Certain aspects that were once high on the priority list are no longer the case, and things that were at one time “a must have” are being replaced by different wants. COVID-19 brought about an unexpected clarity and many people are now jumping into one of life’s biggest changes and moving out of larger cities to settle down in more suburban areas. The pandemic and the thought of what life will be like post-COVID has finally convinced city dwellers to give up on big-city living.

 

The reasons for moving vary; some people are looking to be closer to family, others are in search of more space, and for some, it’s more of a necessity due to the high cost of city living. Some moves have been temporary but it seems as if those short-term stays are becoming more permanent.

 

Now, in the wake of the pandemic, nearly one-third of Americans are considering the move to less populated areas. Crowded cities are no longer as appealing as they once were and living amongst millions of people in such close quarters no longer offers the same romanticism it might have even a year ago.

 

Gone are the days of squeezing into packed elevators, crowded subways, cramming into small neighborhood bars and restaurants, or even the bustle of walking closely next to each other down the street. In today’s era of social distancing, the ways of city living that residents took as “normal” will likely never be normal again.

The things that originally attracted residents to “city life” are currently unavailable and even as they start to reopen, people are still hesitant. They want to stay away from confined spaces and refrain from sharing common areas and amenities in order to continue social distancing.

 

Not being able to access those luxuries that once were attractive brought about a clarity and changed people’s perspective on where they want to live. For some, the allure of the trendier neighborhoods is waning. Instead of stepping out onto a small balcony for a breath of fresh air, they’d much rather step into a more spacious backyard, especially as family and friends these days find gathering at home a much more viable choice.

 

Another big change has been for the employees working from home, many whom have never experienced remote working up until now. Instead of working out of a cramped, small space, if you’re not required to be on premise in the foreseeable future, why not seek out a home that offers enough square footage to potentially create your own separate home office? That appears to be the question many work from home employees are asking themselves right now.

 

These past few months have shown many companies that employees can indeed work successfully off-site. If remote working becomes the “new norm,” then the desire to live close to the office will no longer factor into one’s decision on where best to reside.

 

And while many residents are packing up and heading out of the city, that doesn’t mean one has to completely leave the state (unless that is you want to). There are many surrounding areas outside of the larger cities that offer more spacious living without having to completely forfeit some of the comforts you’re used to and still hope to one day enjoy.

 

What’s unique about Brooklyn is the fact that in addition to the neighborhoods that give off that “city” living vibe, areas like Dumbo, Williamsburg, and Cobble Hill, there are also neighborhoods such as Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, Windsor Terrace, and Dyker Heights, which offer residents an environment that is more residential. With both one and two-family homes on the market, potential buyers have the option of purchasing a home that will allow for family members to move in for that additional rental income.

 

Without moving too far, residents of Brooklyn who do not want to leave the borough but want the luxuries that come with owning a home can find the best of both worlds here. At times, certain areas may have been overlooked for the trendier neighborhoods, but with people looking for larger living space that is no longer the case.

 

Sadly, COVID-19 has instilled in people a sense of dread when it comes to being close to others, and with the uncertainty of what the future holds, along with the changes cities are experiencing, residents are making the conscious choice to head out and purchase now when interest rates are low.

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